Manpoke

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Since learning about the 10,000 steps idea, I've been curious about how many steps I take in a day. So I bought a pedometer. They're called manpokei in Japanese (that's mahn-poe-kay, not man-poke) which literally means "10,000 step measure."

According to what I've read, most Americans take between 900 and 3000 steps per day. That seems so low.

I made an effort today, and managed to walk 14,235 steps. I went to the grocery store (1500 steps) and then walked to work (8,000 steps), to class (1000 steps), and home from the train station (1200 steps). The rest just sort of filled themselves in somehow. 7469 steps (63 minutes) of today's walking was shikkari or steady walking--good aerobic exercise.

Today was an exception, but even on my relaxed days, I'm taking over 3,000 steps. How could anyone possibly walk only 900 steps in a day??

4 Comments

Hm, how does this manpoke work?

I did over 900 steps on a run to 7-11 this morning. IT seems nearly impossible to do a whoe day without take 900 steps.

If you have a home office and take a kid to school in your car, and then sit to work all day it's easy to only do 900 steps in a day. Especially in the winter. :-) I know I've had my share of 900 step days. But I make up for them when I'm in schools.

All hail spring!!!!!

Japan will help you walk a lot more than living in the States. I think the main difference is the train vs. car lifestyle. Three years ago I planted a new church in my wife's hometown of Ome, where we live. Before that I served at three churches in Ebisu, Sangenjaya and Machida so I was on the move constantly. I used the manpokei then and always was over 10,000 but I don't think I am over that now. Back then I didn't have any weight problems either though... hmm

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  • Jonathan Wilson: Japan will help you walk a lot more than living read more
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  • kaeng: Hm, how does this manpoke work? read more

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